Seattle Whale News

Seattle Whale News

Seattle whale news straight from the source updated daily.

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Seattle, WA -- Mar 26, 2020

**We would like to take a quick second to reiterate that while this trivia is fun for people of all ages, "Weekday Whale Wits" was created to keep kids/students engaged while being unable to physically attend classes. These subjects are therefore a little simpler, and we ask that everyone consider our audience when making comments in the comment section. Thank you!**This week’s Weekday Whale Wit theme is: “Spot the Difference!” Look for the differences in toothed versus baleen whales. Thursday:Both toothed whales and baleen whales are mammals and must come to the surface to breathe air, like humans do. They inhale and exhale air through their blowholes, located at their top of their heads. What is the difference between the toothed whale and baleen whale when looking closely at their blowholes?(PLEASE don't comment with the answer so that others may play along. We will post the answer, and more information, at 4pm!)Answer:Toothed whales have one blowhole, while baleen whales have two blowholes! There is a theory that baleen whales have two blowholes because of their massive size and the amount of time they spend underwater. In order to dive and remain submerged for longer periods of time, they must be able to quickly and efficiently inhale and exhale before slipping beneath the surface.Thanks for playing along! Join us tomorrow at 2pm for another "Spot the Difference" Whale Wit! ... See MoreSee Less

**We would like to take a quick second to reiterate that while this trivia is fun for people of all ages, Weekday Whale Wits was created to keep kids/students engaged while being unable to physically attend classes. These subjects are therefore a little simpler, and we ask that everyone consider our audience when making comments in the comment section. Thank you!**

This week’s Weekday Whale Wit theme is: “Spot the Difference!” Look for the differences in toothed versus baleen whales. 

Thursday:
Both toothed whales and baleen whales are mammals and must come to the surface to breathe air, like humans do. They inhale and exhale air through their blowholes, located at their top of their heads. What is the difference between the toothed whale and baleen whale when looking closely at their blowholes?

(PLEASE dont comment with the answer so that others may play along. We will post the answer, and more information, at 4pm!)

Answer:
Toothed whales have one blowhole, while baleen whales have two blowholes! 
There is a theory that baleen whales have two blowholes because of their massive size and the amount of time they spend underwater. In order to dive and remain submerged for longer periods of time, they must be able to quickly and efficiently inhale and exhale before slipping beneath the surface.

Thanks for playing along! Join us tomorrow at 2pm for another Spot the Difference Whale Wit!

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Seattle, WA -- Mar 26, 2020

Today's Weekday Whale Wit! Please feel free to play along, but keep in mind, our audience centers around the kids/students that are unable to attend school and classes right now! Please also refrain from giving away the answer in the comments. We will be modifying the post with more information at 4pm.Thank you! ... See MoreSee Less

Todays Weekday Whale Wit! Please feel free to play along, but keep in mind, our audience centers around the kids/students that are unable to attend school and classes right now! Please also refrain from giving away the answer in the comments. We will be modifying the post with more information at 4pm.

Thank you!

Seattle, WA -- Mar 25, 2020

Here’s Today’s Weekday Whale Wit! ... See MoreSee Less

Here’s Today’s Weekday Whale Wit!

Seattle, WA -- Mar 24, 2020

Join us for today's Weekday Whale Wit! ... See MoreSee Less

Join us for todays Weekday Whale Wit!

Seattle, WA -- Mar 24, 2020

Gray whales in northern Puget Sound: Saratoga Passage: 11:07 - Current direction is S toward Whidbey.; 10:55 - Headed across the bay now toward the State Park. 3 spouts.;10:51 - Count of 2 Grays that just arrived in Elger Bay. Dave Davenport 💚 NOTE: Whale watching life during COVID-19: We have appreciated the leadership taken by our local and state officials and the need to practice social distancing and stay home except for essential trips out for the greater health and well being of all of our citizens, especially those most vulnerable. Please check city ordinances before heading outside. We know many are fortunate to live on or near the water, and/or have water views, have nearby walking access, or can view from the safety of their vehicle near their homes so we will continue to post reports in hopes some are able to continue to help with sightings, gray whale arrivals, IDs etc. Today, and for the foreseeable future, we cannot live and engage life as usual, but one day we will return to some version of normalcy and will have many wonderful opportunities to re-connect with and enjoy the whales who call the Salish Sea home. For now let’s do our part and get through this as safely and thoughtfully as we can, together.REMINDERS: ✅ Check city ordinances before heading out. ✅ Please slow to under 7 knots at first sign of any whale.✅ Maintain minimum distance of 100 yards from baleen whales#BeWhaleWise link & other info in comments.#OrcaNetwork #WashingtonWhaleSightingNetwork #NorthPugetSoundGrayWhales #NPSGrays #GrayWhales ... See MoreSee Less

Seattle, WA -- Mar 24, 2020

The T46s with T46Bs (including T46B1B Tl'uk, the pale whale) are here in upper Carr Inlet, southern Puget Sound.Thanks to stunning video by Deanna Sparks Kjorlien (which we will post a bit later today in separate post) we know who is here.💚 NOTE: Whale watching life during COVID-19: We have appreciated the leadership taken by our local and state officials and the need to practice social distancing and stay home except for essential trips out for the greater health and well being of all of our citizens, especially those most vulnerable.We know many are fortunate to live on or near the water, and/or have water views, have nearby walking access, or can view from the safety of their vehicle near their homes so we will continue to post reports in hopes some are able to continue to help with sightings, gray whale arrivals, IDs etc. ❗️Please see Ariel Yseth's important information in comments❗️ Today, and for the foreseeable future, we cannot live and engage life as usual, but one day we will return to some version of normalcy and will have many wonderful opportunities to re-connect with and enjoy the whales who call the Salish Sea home.For now let’s do our part and get through this as safely and thoughtfully as we can, together. 💚REMINDERS:✅ Check city ordinances before heading outside. ✅ Please slow to under 7 knots at first sign of any whale.✅ Maintain minimum distance of 200 yards from Bigg’s Transients.#BeWhaleWise link & other info in comments.#OrcaNetwork #WashingtonWhaleSightingNetwork #BiggsKillerWhale #TransientKillerWhales #PugetSoundOrcas #MammalEatingTypeOrcas ... See MoreSee Less

Seattle, WA -- Mar 23, 2020

Join us for Weekday Whale Wits! Answer(s) at 4pm! ... See MoreSee Less

Join us for Weekday Whale Wits! Answer(s) at 4pm!

Seattle, WA -- Mar 23, 2020

Gray whales around Hat Island currently and in Saratoga Passage earlier: 13:25 - There are 3 grays hanging around SE Hat Island, have been there for several hours, seeing spouts from distance. Lori Christopher12:38 - One possibly 2 grays just off Boy and Dog Park, approximately mid-channel. Appear to be feeding. Mostly staying in place. Jeanne Hamilton ✅REMINDERS🔘Please slow to under 7 knots at first sign of any whale.🔘Maintain minimum distance of 100 yards from baleen whales🔘 #BeWhaleWise link & other info in comments.#OrcaNetwork #WashingtonWhaleSightingNetwork#NorthPugetSoundGrayWhales #NPSGrays #GrayWhales ... See MoreSee Less

Seattle, WA -- Mar 23, 2020

🐬 Edit: Thanks to photos by Marla Smith & accuracy check by Brittany Noelle...looks like we have the T46s here. ❤️ (see photo in comments)10:05 - Maija, WSF Marine Ops callled to report pod of orcas off Fauntleroy dock. Ferry had to come to hard stop. Pod included adults & young, was close to shore and was reportedly southbound, but unclear if continued in that direction. Also at 8 am WSF observed gray whale surface few times of Pier 52, we were unable to resightnthat whale. If anyone sees either please let us know. 💚 PLEASE NOTE: During the Covid-19 pandemic we have appreciated the leadership taken by our local and state officials. We support their regulations and guidelines and what is being asked of us to stay home as much as possible for the greater health and well being of all of our citizens, especially our elders and those with health issues. We know many are fortunate to live on or near the water, and/or have water views, have nearby walking access, or can view from the safety of their vehicle so we will continue to post reports in hopes some are able to view whales and help with sightings, gray whale arrivals, IDs etc. Today, and for the foreseeable future, we cannot live and engage life as usual, but one day we will return to some version of normalcy and will have many wonderful opportunities to re-connect with and enjoy the whales who call the Salish Sea home. For now let’s do our part and get through this as safely and thoughtfully as we can, together. 💚 ... See MoreSee Less

Seattle, WA -- Mar 22, 2020

"Whale Tails" Do you have a favorite book about a whale? Tell us about it! ... See MoreSee Less

Whale Tails  Do you have a favorite book about a whale? Tell us about it!

Seattle, WA -- Mar 22, 2020

Orcas in Puget Sound - Possibly the Bigg's Transients (mammal eating type) who were here yesterday: 11:46 - Maija with WS Ferries Marine Ops called to report pod of orca off traffic lanes Kingston heading towards Edmonds.REMINDERS: ✅ Please slow to under 7 knots at first sign of any whale. ✅ Maintain minimum distance of 200 yards from Bigg’s Transients.#BeWhaleWise link & other info in comments. ... See MoreSee Less

Seattle, WA -- Mar 22, 2020

🌤 🐳 Sunday in the Sound gray Whale Sightings 🐳 🌤(As day progresses gray whale reports from around Northern Puget Sound will be added in comments)08:09 - Maija with WS Ferries Marine Ops called to report one gray whale southbound between Clinton and Mukilteo. ✅REMINDERS 🔘Please slow to under 7 knots at first sign of any whale. 🔘Maintain minimum distance of 100 yards from baleen whales 🔘 #BeWhaleWise link & other info in comments.#OrcaNetwork #WashingtonWhaleSightingNetwork#NorthPugetSoundGrayWhales #NPSGrays #GrayWhales ... See MoreSee Less

Seattle, WA -- Mar 21, 2020

🐬 At 12:30, Christopher Lewman reported: “Good report of orca off Port Townsend…Southbound, into PT Bay”. If anyone has any updates please let us know. 🐬💚 PLEASE NOTE: During the Covid-19 pandemic we have appreciated the leadership taken by our local and state officials. We support their regulations and guidelines and what is being asked of us to stay home as much as possible for the greater health and well being of all of our citizens, especially our elders and those with health issues. We know many are fortunate to live on or near the water, and/or have water views, have nearby walking access, or can view from the safety of their vehicle so we will continue to post reports in hopes some are able to view whales and help with sightings, gray whale arrivals, IDs etc. Today, and for the foreseeable future, we cannot live and engage life as usual, but one day we will return to some version of normalcy and will have many wonderful opportunities to re-connect with and enjoy the whales who call the Salish Sea home. For now let’s do our part and get through this as safely and thoughtfully as we can, together. 💚 ... See MoreSee Less

Seattle, WA -- Mar 21, 2020

☁️ Saturday morning gray whales 🐳: (edit: see comments for all northern Puget Sound gray reports)10:45 - Maija with WS Ferries Marine Ops just called to report crews spotted a gray whale north of Clinton heading eastbound. ➡️ REMINDERS ⬅️🐳 Please slow to under 7 knots at first sign of any whale.🐳 Maintain minimum distance of 100 yards from baleen whales🐳 #BeWhaleWise link & other info in comments.#OrcaNetwork #WashingtonWhaleSightingNetwork#NorthPugetSoundGrayWhales #NPSGrays #GrayWhales ... See MoreSee Less

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