Seattle Whale News

Seattle Whale News

Seattle whale news straight from the source updated daily.

Used for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
Used for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
Langley Whale Center shared a post.
Langley Whale Center

Seattle, WA -- Jan 23, 2020

Orcas sightings in the Clinton/Mukilteo ferry lanes. J, K and L Pods have been in Puget Sound today. Check our Orca Network Facebook page for updates! ... See MoreSee Less

Used for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons

Seattle, WA -- Jan 23, 2020

Orcas on The Whale Trail! Southern resident orcas (J and K pods) heading north towards West Seattle now. We'll be at Alki south of the Lighthouse with binoculars to share. See you there! ... See MoreSee Less

Seattle, WA -- Jan 21, 2020

6 pm - Ken Balcomb, Center for Whale Research, relayed a report from Mark Malleson, of J and K pods traveling slowly east in the Strait of Juan de Fuca, between Race Rocks and Port Angeles, against a tide. This could be a good time to monitor the Orcasound, Lime Kiln, and Port Townsend hydrophones. ... See MoreSee Less

Seattle, WA -- Jan 21, 2020

🐋💙 A great example of the importance of photo/video documentation accompanying whale sighting reports:This image included with a report to Orca Network enabled us to ID North Puget Sound (NPS) gray whale CRC-2246 as the whale Chris Beamer Otterson observed and reported to us yesterday (January 20th) traveling northbound off Point Jefferson, Kingston. Without the photo we may not have even known the species, let alone the individual’s identity. Please continue to share your reports and any images/videos which assist researchers who track the whales of the Salish Sea and Puget Sound basin. Along with other large whale and cetacean research, Cascadia Research Collective in Olympia has been tracking and conducting research on this population of grays since the early 1990’s. Gray whale 2246 is a newer addition to the NPS population and now enters her/his 3rd year of utilizing these inland waters. Some history: CRC-2246 was first ever documented once in March 2018 then showed up again 8 months later (confirmed on November 30th, 2018) and stayed over into 2019 where she/he was seen over winter & spring months feeding along with the other NPS grays. Like most of the others we believe 2246 exited sometime late spring. Mid December 2019 we had several reports of a gray feeding in the Snohomish Delta in Possession Sound, then on December 29th photos by naturalists with Puget Sound Express confirmed a gray feeding up there was in fact 2246! Annually NPS grays usually begin arriving inland Puget Sound mid February/early March to feed on ghost shrimp, but the past 2 years have been unusual. Last year NOAA declared an Unusual Mortality Event which you can read about on their dedicated webpage: www.fisheries.noaa.gov/national/marine-life-distress/2019-gray-whale-unusual-mortality-event-alon...Thanks Chris! 🐋💙 ... See MoreSee Less

🐋💙 A great example of the importance of photo/video documentation accompanying whale sighting reports:

This image included with a report to Orca Network enabled us to ID North Puget Sound (NPS) gray whale CRC-2246 as the whale Chris Beamer Otterson observed and reported to us yesterday (January 20th) traveling northbound off Point Jefferson, Kingston. Without the photo we may not have even known the species, let alone the individual’s identity. 
Please continue to share your reports and any images/videos which assist researchers who track the whales of the Salish Sea and Puget Sound basin.  

Along with other large whale and cetacean research, Cascadia Research Collective in Olympia has been tracking and conducting research on this population of grays since the early 1990’s. Gray whale 2246 is a newer addition to the NPS population and now enters her/his 3rd year of utilizing these inland waters. 

Some history: CRC-2246 was first ever documented once in March 2018 then showed up again 8 months later (confirmed on November 30th, 2018) and stayed over into 2019 where she/he was seen over winter & spring months feeding along with the other NPS grays. Like most of the others we believe 2246 exited sometime late spring.  
Mid December 2019 we had several reports of a gray feeding in the Snohomish Delta in Possession Sound, then on December 29th photos by naturalists with Puget Sound Express confirmed a gray feeding up there was in fact 2246! 

Annually NPS grays usually begin arriving inland Puget Sound mid February/early March to feed on ghost shrimp, but the past 2 years have been unusual. Last year NOAA declared an Unusual Mortality Event which you can read about on their dedicated webpage: https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/national/marine-life-distress/2019-gray-whale-unusual-mortality-event-along-west-coast

Thanks Chris! 🐋💙
Orca Network shared a post.
Orca Network

Seattle, WA -- Jan 18, 2020

Stop by our Langley Whale Center this holiday weekend! ... See MoreSee Less

Stop by our Langley Whale Center this holiday weekend!Image attachment

Seattle, WA -- Jan 18, 2020

Looking for a trip that includes a variety of activities and gorgeous scenery? Plan a trip to the San Juan Islands! Join us for a whale watching tour and then head out to the Mount Baker area! ... See MoreSee Less

Looking for a trip that includes a variety of activities and gorgeous scenery?  Plan a trip to the San Juan Islands!  Join us for a whale watching tour and then head out to the Mount Baker area!
Orca Network shared a post.
Orca Network

Seattle, WA -- Jan 15, 2020

Much appreciation to our friends at Orca Behavior Institute for all their work such as this, a 2019 picture of the Southern Residents inland presence by pod (and thanks to so many of your for contributing your sightings to our Whale Sighting Network):"We've shared same data about Southern Resident killer whale presence in the Salish Sea for 2019, but that's for the population as a whole - what about when you look at each pod individually? (There are three images posted below - click on each one to see the full graph for each pod.)J-Pod continues to make up the majority of the Salish Sea Southern Resident sightings, having been present at least in part on over 100 days. By contrast, Ks and Ls were each only here on about 30 days in all of 2019.The seasonal graphs look almost inverted from the way things were 10-15 years ago. Now, there are hardly any Southern Residents present in the "core" months of April-September, with many more sightings in what used to be the "off" season of October-March.The other big thing to note is how often incomplete pods are here. It's no longer enough to report that J-Pod or K-Pod is present; pod splitting has become so much more common that it makes more sense to track them on the matriline level at this point. For instance, it has been a full year since all of L-Pod was confirmed in inland waters at the same time.We love compiling this data and tracking these trends over time is key to understanding our shifting ecosystem, but it is only possible through all the citizen scientists on shore and on the water who report their sightings, and the organizations that are willing to collaboratively share such data, including the Pacific Whale Watch Association and Orca Network. Thank you to everyone who contributes to this important data set!" ... See MoreSee Less

Much appreciation to our friends at Orca Behavior Institute for all their work such as this, a 2019 picture of the Southern Residents inland presence by pod (and thanks to so many of your for contributing your sightings to our Whale Sighting Network):

Weve shared same data about Southern Resident killer whale presence in the Salish Sea for 2019, but thats for the population as a whole - what about when you look at each pod individually? (There are three images posted below - click on each one to see the full graph for each pod.)

J-Pod continues to make up the majority of the Salish Sea Southern Resident sightings, having been present at least in part on over 100 days. By contrast, Ks and Ls were each only here on about 30 days in all of 2019.

The seasonal graphs look almost inverted from the way things were 10-15 years ago. Now, there are hardly any Southern Residents present in the core months of April-September, with many more sightings in what used to be the off season of October-March.

The other big thing to note is how often incomplete pods are here. Its no longer enough to report that J-Pod or K-Pod is present; pod splitting has become so much more common that it makes more sense to track them on the matriline level at this point. For instance, it has been a full year since all of L-Pod was confirmed in inland waters at the same time.

We love compiling this data and tracking these trends over time is key to understanding our shifting ecosystem, but it is only possible through all the citizen scientists on shore and on the water who report their sightings, and the organizations that are willing to collaboratively share such data, including the Pacific Whale Watch Association and Orca Network. Thank you to everyone who contributes to this important data set!Image attachmentImage attachment
Orca Network shared a post.
Orca Network

Seattle, WA -- Jan 12, 2020

Check our Langley Whale Center Facebook page for updates on days open depending on road conditions. Our regular winter hours are Thursdays through Mondays, 11 am till 5 pm. ... See MoreSee Less

Seattle, WA -- Jan 10, 2020

Orcas observed around the San Juan Islands: 13:11 - Denise with WS Ferry Ops called: MV Tillikum reports 3 orcas (male & 2 juveniles) north of Shaw ferry dock heading west to Wasp passage.- SLOW to under 7 knots at first sight of any whale.- STAY 200 Yards Biggs/300 yards Southern Residents - SEE #BeWhaleWise info & link in comments (including how/where to report violations). ... See MoreSee Less

Comments are closed.